Covid vaccine what to expect

CDC What to Expect after Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine

We all are new to Covid-19 vaccines and are not sure what to expect after taking the new vaccine. Like any other vaccines or like flu shots, some side effects are expected. In US people are getting vaccinated to fight Covid. One of the two FDA approved vaccines- Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine or Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine​​ are being administered. What are the side effects and when one should be contacting doctor regarding allergic reactions, what are symptoms of side effects etc. these are the doubts arises in one’s mind. Center For Disease Control has answered several such questions- for those who would like to know about the safety, allergic reactions, and what to expect after one receives Covid-19 vaccine -Healthy LIfe

COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you from getting COVID-19. You may have some side effects, which are normal signs that your body is building protection. These side effects may affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days.

Common side effects

On the arm where you got the shot:

  • Pain
  • Swelling

Throughout the rest of your body:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Tiredness
  • Headache

Helpful tips

  • If you have pain or discomfort, talk to your doctor about taking an over-the-counter medicine, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen.

To reduce pain and discomfort where you got the shot:

  • Apply a clean, cool, wet washcloth over the area.
  • Use or exercise your arm.
  • To reduce discomfort from fever:
  • Drink plenty of fluids.
  • Dress lightly.

When to call the doctor

In most cases, discomfort from fever or pain is normal. Contact your doctor or healthcare provider:

  • If the redness or tenderness where you got the shot increases after 24 hours
  • If your side effects are worrying you or do not seem to be going away after a few days
  • If you get a COVID-19 vaccine and you think you might be having a severe allergic reaction after leaving the vaccination site, seek immediate medical care by calling 911 or emergency number.

Remember

  1. Side effects may feel like flu and even affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days.
  2. With most COVID-19 vaccines, you will need 2 shots in order for them to work. Get the second shot even if you have side effects after the first shot, unless a vaccination provider or your doctor tells you not to get a second shot.
  3. It takes time for your body to build protection after any vaccination. COVID-19 vaccines that require 2 shots may not protect you until a week or two after your second shot.
  4. It’s important for everyone to continue using all the tools available to help stop this pandemic as we learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work in real-world conditions. Cover your mouth and nose with a mask when around others, stay at least 6 feet away from others, avoid crowds, and wash your hands often.​

COVID-19 vaccination will help keep you from getting COVID-19

  • All COVID-19 vaccines currently available in the United States have been shown to be highly effective at preventing COVID-19. Learn more about the different COVID-19 vaccines.
  • All COVID-19 vaccines that are in development are being carefully evaluated in clinical trials and will be authorized or approved only if they make it substantially less likely you’ll get COVID-19. Learn more about how federal partners are ensuring COVID-19 vaccines work.
  • Based on what we know about vaccines for other diseases and early data from clinical trials, experts believe that getting a COVID-19 vaccine may also help keep you from getting seriously ill even if you do get COVID-19.
  • Getting vaccinated yourself may also protect people around you, particularly people at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.
  • Experts continue to conduct more studies about the effect of COVID-19 vaccination on severity of illness from COVID-19, as well as its ability to keep people from spreading the virus that causes COVID-19.

For more information please visit: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines

Image credit: Image by Alexandra_Koch from Pixabay (Free for commercial use)


Author: Sumana Rao | Posted on: January 6, 2021

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